Smokin Books

On My Radar: Books of March

My desk looks like a literary metropolis. Spinesville. Current population: 31. These towering skyscrapers of proofs and paperbacks are evidence of my inherent inability to put anything away properly, but my current situation is also because last month I was lucky enough to attend a few publisher showcases and was given a selection of cracking new books to read and shout about.

I’m the kind of girl that can’t help but dip into the cooking sherry so I’ve already read ahead into some of June’s releases, but this little post is limited to the books I recommend you drum up a bit of enthusiasm for in March. If you don’t have the dollar for them this month, add them to that scrappy list you keep in the back of your diary or on your phone, that list of books you don’t want to forget about that’s usually expanded after a few pints, when everything seems appealing.

The Lonely City: Adventures in the Art of Being Alone by Olivia Laing (new in paperback, 2nd March, Canongate).
I’ve been itching to read this since the hardback made waves in March of last year. Exploring the relationship between loneliness in art and loneliness in real life, Laing’s meditation on being alone made several prominent Books of the Year 2016 lists including The Guardian, The Telegraph and New Statesman.

Nasty Women compiled by 404 Ink (8th March, 404 Ink).
What better way is there to celebrate International Women’s Day? Aren’t we all absolutely buzzing in our britches over this crowd-funded essay collection? From 404ink.com: “From working class experience to sexual assault, being an immigrant, divides in Trump’s America, Brexit, pregnancy, contraception, Repeal the 8th, identity, family, finding a voice, punk, role models, fetishisation, power – this timely book covers a vast range of being a woman today.”

Everyone is Watching by Megan Bradbury (new in paperback, 9th March, Picador).
This is a portrait of New York, peering over the shoulder of four key New Yorkers: Walt Whitman, Robert Moses, Robert Mapplethorpe and Edmund White. I am naturally drawn to anything that might involve Patti Smith and so of course I’m feeling like the anticipatory-wiggle-cat gif when I think about this book. You can read an extract here:

Foreign Soil by Maxine Beneba Clarke (new in paperback, 9th March, Corsair).
On (well, the day after but it’s actually in stores already) International Women’s Day, why not put your money where your mouth is and pick up this absolutely stunning collection of stories that meditate on Blackness, immigration, asylum, political activism, grief, exhaustion, parenthood, writing, rebelling, fucking up and atonement? These stories cross space and time, from 1960s Brixton to present day Sri Lanka, stopping off in Kingston, New Orleans and Sydney in between. This is an essential collection to read in 2017.

The Bricks that Built the Houses by Kate Tempest (new in paperback, 9th March, Bloomsbury).
I felt lukewarm about Let Them Eat Chaos, but the debut novel from spoken word poet Kate Tempest is on my radar as it’s been compared to Eimear McBride’s A Girl is a Half-Formed Thing and Jon McGregor’s If Nobody Speaks of Remarkable Things.

the princess saves herself in this one by Amanda Lovelace (23rd March, Andrews McMeel).
From the same publisher as best-selling internet sensation Milk & Honey, Andrews McMeel are clearly going for a similar vibe with this one. Suits me as I’m down to try anything twice. I loved Milk & Honey – who didn’t? – and I’m constantly trying (and failing) to widen my poetry-reading net, so perhaps I’ll give this a spin.

What’s on your radar for March? What have I missed?

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s